Frequently Asked Questions Participants Guide

Join the Conversation:

Record thoughts and questions here that come up as you watch the episode.  Explore them later with the group.
Listen to God’s Word: Romans 8:18-25

 

 

 

Discuss the Episode

1. Randy mentions that we are to be stewards of God’s creation, which means God gave humans responsibility for the Earth and the welfare of its environment.  What do you think about that?  

2. Don expressed a concern that many people have—the seeming unfairness of who goes to heaven and who goes to hell.  Randy’s response involved two Biblical concepts—the seriousness of our alienation and sin that makes our default destination hell—and the sufficiency of what Christ did on the cross to pay for our sin.  Did Randy’s answers satisfy you?  What other questions do you have about this issue?    

3. Don mentions the quote in Randy’s book: “We cannot anticipate or desire what we cannot imagine.”  How have these conversations changed or helped you re-imagine what heaven will be like?

Resources for Further Growth

Reflect on What Others Have to Say
Underline and mark ideas you would like to discuss.

When human beings give their heartfelt allegiance to and worship that which is not God, they progressively cease to reflect the image of God.  One of the primary laws of human life is that you become like what you worship; what’s more, you reflect what you worship not only back to the object itself but also outward to the world around… My suggestion is that it is possible for human beings so to continue down this road, so to refuse all whisperings of good news, all glimmers of true light, all promptings to turn and go the other way, all signposts to the love of God, that after death they become at last, by their own effective choice, beings that once were human but now are not, creatures that have ceased to bear the divine image at all.  With the death of that body in which they inhabited God’s good world, in which the flickering flame of goodness had not been completely snuffed out, they pass simultaneously not only beyond hope but also beyond pity.
N.T. Wright, Surprised by Hope

There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations—these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit—immortal horrors or everlasting splendors. This does not mean that we are to be perpetually solemn. We must play. But our merriment must be of the kind (and it is, in fact, the merriest kind) which exists between people who have, from the outset, taken each other seriously—no flippancy, no superiority, no presumption. And our charity must be real and costly love, with deep feeling for the sins in spite of which we love the sinners—no mere tolerance, or indulgence which parodies love as flippancy parodies merriment. Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.
C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

 

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